Oh, Boy!

Oh, Boy! 3″x3″ Oil on stretched canvas

I have had the Pillsbury Dough  Boy in my kitchen for years and years. You know, he never ages! 😉 

Someone once said that it’s tough to paint portraits of things that aren’t human faces (like dolls). I can say ‘Yes’, that’s true! BUT, I like this little guy, and he can smile at you from any little spot — maybe near your breakfast table. Super mini!

Lil Pig

Lil Pig 3″x3″

This CUTE ‘Lil Pig’ is on a mega mini, super tiny canvas which only makes it more adorable. Is he really big and the canvas is small? Or is he small, so he only needs a tiny canvas? You decide. 🙂

I’m obsessed with my tiny pig figures. This painting explores a bit more color. He’s still got that great expression. 

Hop over to the shop!

Pink Pins

These clothespins on a pink background are hot to trot. What is behind the nostalgia of clothes pins?? No idea. I think it’s one of those things that just doesn’t matter — they’re fun.

Hitting these with the right light turns them into sculpture, and that is, ultimately, what gets me.

Feeling like nothing is happening fast enough in the studio lately. I have a million ideas to paint. Just can’t paint fast enough!

Secrets

I found these little pigs at a junk shop. I love them so much!

Little salt and pepper shakers — they appear to be hand-made out of clay. I’m pretty sure that my painting makes them out to be slightly cuter than they are. Ha! (Don’t tell them.)

Each time I paint these little cuties, I have fun wondering what they’re thinking or saying or doing. What is going on in their little brains?

You Do You

This young woman has a little attitude. I imagine that she’s thinking how to politely tell someone to MYOB (mind your own business).

I experimented a bit with this one — scratching into the hair for some cool texture. What I LOVE about it (there’s a lot), but the eyes. The eyes!! Or like my son said ‘the eyebrows!). Ha.

This piece was available at 200 Main, but some lovely person has already swooped in and chosen it for their collection.

How We Were

My grandma’s favorite flower (or at least one of them) was fuchsias. Every year she would get big hanging baskets of them and hang them on her deck.

Painting this fuchsia painting I’m reminded of going to grandma’s house (the farm). The best place was sitting on her deck listening to the adults tell stories or play guitar.

— Now showing at 200 Main Gallery

Love come rescue

‘Love come rescue’ is an oil painting that I completed recently for a project in collaboration with Mayo Clinic Health System. Expressing the stories of the healthcare workers in our community rang a bell for me. Thinking about what the healthcare workers have been going through — I wanted to do something as an artist to honor their work.

How has the pandemic impacted you? How do you deal with it? I find that art resonates when it expresses things that we can’t express with words.

The Healing Reflections mural wall visited Eau Claire at the Pablo Center one day. I had the good fortune to be able to speak with Dr. Todd Wright who was one of the people that came up with the idea of the mural project. His enthusiasm and compassion were contagious!

Once I read the stories that were sent to me, one stood out because of the way this person expressed their emotion. Their anger and frustration, the isolation and trying to work through the day-to-day in a situation like the pandemic spoke to me.

I tend to get a rush of ideas, and so it started. The final idea is simple and yet speaks to the essence of what they went through. Isolation — of others because of the pandemic / Covid or because of their own anger or because of the work situation — all are represented by the large, thorny branches. We’re isolated.

The dove is usually seen as a sign of peace or love and yet this dove is flying into the face of all these thorns. It’s coming to rescue us. Will it be hurt in the process?

We can see (and BE) compassion for others by our actions. We can, even when we’re separated, express the love for our neighbor through what we do or don’t do. We (like the dove) may be hurt in the process, but that doesn’t reduce the need or the beauty of the effort.

Below is a video they created that talks about the idea of the mural project. Enjoy!

Mayo Mural Project

Imagination

‘Imagination’ 8×10 oil on stretched canvas.

I named this one ‘Imagination’ because of how excited I used to get when I saw big merry-go-rounds. I would search and search for the best and most beautiful horse to ride — bonus if they went up and down!

There are things that still spark that excitement for me. Yes, and merry-go-rounds.

Big Bear

‘Big Bear’, larger than 10×12, oil on wood. This painting is actually on a piece of furniture for my parents. It is a measure of ‘try, try again’ because I had to sand the first painting down and start over.

Persistence is key! Whenever I find that I have a new obstacle in my artistic journey, I have to slow down and push to get past it. This was one of those projects, but when I did get it right, it was SO fun.

Old Man, what are you thinking?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Old Man ($80) — I wonder what you are thinking. He’s thinking, “Wow! $80 for a framed art piece like that!” (Yep, I asked.) This piece is approx 11×14 and the black frame really sets it off.

This drawing on toned paper is the one that everyone remarks about. Tomorrow at the end of the day, I will be hanging it at the Eau Claire County Courthouse on the 3rd floor. Go check it out (AFTER 01/21/2020) and see if it would be a great addition to your collection!

Shipping Additional.

No Bull

20-002 No Bull thumbnail


I love this painting just because of the light — who wouldn’t fall in love with ‘No Bull’? I’m tempted to do this again just to play with it, but we’ll see — I have plenty of things that I’m painting lately.

This is a 5×7 oil painting on linen panel.

Fighting a little burnout today. All work and no play means that I took a nap, too. Whenever I lose motivation, I always think ‘nap’. 😉

I’m planning to enter this beautiful little piece in Arts West. No idea if they will accept, of course — and every year they choose a different artist to curate the event, so how can you plan for that? Create art, take great photos and hope for the best.